Jewett Physical Therapy Talks Golf Stretches

By: | Tags: | Comments: 0 | October 26th, 2017

Golfing stretches should be part of any training program.

The mechanics of the golf swing require flexibility, coordination, strength and stability. Golfers with poor mobility will suffer in terms of generating club head speed and will likely develop compensatory adjustments to their swing that will lead to inaccuracy and injury.

Learn what the experts at Jewett Orthopaedic say:
Why do we need to do golfing stretches? Golf is an activity that requires strength, flexibility, coordination, and to a lesser extent muscular and cardiovascular endurance. Golfers with limited range of motion will be severely affected in their ability to generate club speed. Loss of range of motion is probably more important than loss of strength in affecting club speed in an aging golfer. Loss of spinal rotation, hip rotation, and shoulder range of motion affect how far back the club will start and the length of follow through.

Power is dependent on the velocity of your swing as it hits the ball. The range of motion in your trunk directly correlates to the ability to generate club head speed. The golf club has a limited amount of time to accelerate during your down swing to achieve its maximum velocity at contact.

By improving your flexibility, the degree of trunk rotation relative to your hips, hence, the distance of the upswing, you likewise increase the distance that the club has a chance to accelerate prior to contact with the ball.

Golfing Stretches – What Type of Stretching is Best for Golf Performance?

A study published in the International Journal of Sports Medicine in 2009 (1) examined the effects of static, dynamic, and no stretching on golf performance after their inclusion in part of a warm up. While there are many determinants of golf performance, golf performance in this study was measured as club head speed, ball speed, swing path, point of impact on the club head, and club face angle. Measurements of club head speed were taken immediately after stretching, five minutes after stretching. 15 minutes after stretching, and 30 minutes after stretching.

Result were as follows:
Dynamic golfing stretches produced significantly greater club head speeds than static stretching and no stretching. This effect was present even 30 miniutes post-stretch.

Dynamic golfing stretches produced significanly greater ball speeds than static stretching and no stretching. This effect was present even 30 miniutes post-stretch.

Dynamic golfing stretches produced significantly straighter swing paths that static stretching and no stretching. This effect was present even 30 miniutes post-stretch.

Dynamic golfing stretches produced impact points on the club face that were more centred that static stretching or no stretching. This effect was present even 30 miniutes post-stretch.

The club face angle was not affected by stretching. There was no significant difference in club head speed between those that performed static stretches and no stretches.

There was no significant difference in ball speed between those that performed static stretches and no stretches.

There was no significant difference in swing path between those that performed static stretches and no stretches.

There was no significant difference in the impact point on the club head between those that performed static stretches and no stretches.

Recommendations based on this study suggest a good dynamic warmup is in order prior to a golf game to improve performance.

CLICK TO VIEW THIS VIDEO: